Anabat Roost Logger

Anabat Roost Logger

 

I had a good look at the Anabat Roost Logger over the weekend of the National Bat Conference and Chris Corben was good enough to install the drivers on my laptop as well as hand over a folder of recording to get a taste of what it’s capable of recording.

On first look I’m interested. Whilst it isn’t a full blown recording detector capable of species identification, the Roost Logger will enable measurement of activity and identification to genus level. Whilst the microphone is most sensitive at 42khz the results included Lesser Horseshoe calls though the bats have to be within a couple of metres to record from what I’m told. For research into swarming and roost sites this should prove very useful for finding out when bats are active and getting an idea of what you’re likely to encounter. So Roost Logger deployed first to see where to focus survey effort and more expensive kit makes perfect sense.

The whole kit is enclosed within a small pelicase which should make stashing the detector fairly easy in most sites.

I’ve got an Anabat Roost Logger on the way for review and will be getting it straight out monitoring a cave so expect a review by the end of October……

A new Anabat on the way? – Updated

It looks like Titley Scientific are about to release a new version of the Anabat built specifically for long term monitoring in caves, tunnels and roosts.

Anabat Roost Logger

The features all seem sensible enough:

  • Long running times on internal batteries
  • Temperature logging
  • Waterproof case
  • Sealed mic

The rugged peli case style housing looks up to the job and the (let’s hope) waterproof mic will be a great step forward for Anabat. But it raises the question; will the sealed mic be available to retrofit existing detectors?

A long time bugbear of the Anabat when used underground is the, what seems to be, inevitable burn out of the mic once condensation builds. My record is 5 mics in a season monitoring Myotis swarming sites, not just an expense but also frustrating because of lost data and downtime.

As an existing user I don’t want to replace the Anabats I already own, I want a mic that allows me to use them without that headache. It’s one reason I’ve been contemplating switching to the SM2Bat+ from Wildlife Acoustics.

Let’s hope there’s some good news for existing users too.

UPDATE

With a price of £307.20 the Anabat Roost Logger could be a game changer although that depends if it’s capable of species identification or just Monitoring activity levels and temporal patterns at any roost.

Whilst the Titley webpage states it’s compatible with existing software it’s a bit vague on what information is captured. Activity and species ID for under £500? Maybe that’s a bit ‘moon on a stick’ at the moment.

If it is just an activity logger it’s still a useful bit of kit of course, especially for initial swarming site research, but you’ll need to place more expensive kit in the field to identify what bat species are using your site.

*** Update as of 4.9.2012 Reply from Titley states that the datalogger “still presents data in sequence file and ZCA formats, the same as all previous Anabat units. The major difference is the ability to deploy it for long periods and program it to record selectively as the season changes”.

 

Lascar USB2 Temperature and Humidity Datalogger

Lascar USB2 temperature and Humidity Datalogger – £49.95 (at time of press)

From: http://www.lascarelectronics.com/temperaturedatalogger.php?datalogger=102

Pro’s: Small, cheap and easily programmable.

Cons: Batteries need ordering (ebay is your friend here)

Lascar USB2 Datalogger

Lascar USB2 Datalogger

The Lascar USB2 datalogger is small, cheap and a very unobtrusive datalogger that’s perfect for recording conditions in bat roosts and hibernation sites. This datalogger is very suitable for monitoring crevices due to it’s size.

Lascar monitoring crevices

Lascar USB2 monitoring Temp/Rh in crevices used by Natterer's bats

Very easy to program with the supplied EasyLog USB software I tend to set them up to monitor at half hour intervals which means the battery lasts one year even in sub zero temperatures experienced during winter in exposed sites. Shorter intervals are possible but this obviously affects battery life.

With a netbook and a pocket of spare 1/2AA lithium batteries you can download and reset dataloggers in the field with ease.

Data downloads can be viewed either within EasyLog or imported into excel or similar spreadsheet programs.