Anabat SD1 and SD2

Anabat SD1 (now superceded by SD2)

From: http://www.titley-scientific.com/uk/index.php/anabat-bat-detector

Price: £2062 for SD2 and pda kit

Pro’s: Versatile, small data files.

Cons: microphones sensitive to water damage, cost compared to rivals.

Anabat with pda

Anabat set up with gps and pda

The Anabat is a zero crossing bat detector from Titley Electronics and has long been the workhorse for bat workers needing static longterm monitoring. It’s a versatile bit of kit, capable of either static programmed use or coupled with a pda and gps or just a gps to record transect surveys.

I’ve been using Anabat SD1’s and SD2’s for quite a few years now and up until recently relied on them for most of my survey requirements. The live display of sonograms on the pda is a great tool for instant in the field ID and also invaluable as a teaching tool when running bat detector workshops.

The zero crossing analysis files produced by the Anabat are tiny (think kb’s not mb’s) allowing long term monitoring in busy active sites without the need of purchasing multiple expensive data cards. Coupled with a decent external 12v battery it’s possible to leave the detector running up to a month without filling a 2gb CF card. Workflow using AnalookW to analyse all those collected files is reasonably quick too. Note however this is a very visual system with little useful audio output either in the field or back at the computer.

Hi and Lo MIcs

Ergonomically  and weight wise that Anabat and pda are going to be noticeable if you’re carrying one all night although easy enough to handle in the field.

For european batworkers the two mics of interest are the standard mic and the hi mic, the hi mic is recommended where Horseshoe bats may be encountered or where you’re using an extension cable longer than 1 metre.

For me the weak point of the system is the microphone that needs careful thought to protect it from water contact when deploying it in the field. This is easy on open sites where a cover and 45degree sound deflector can be used to keep the mic sheltered. Underground in typical UK 99% humidity conditions I’ve found condensation eventually builds and takes the mic out. Some users compromise recordings and sensitivity by covering the mic in clingfilm to avoid this.

In use with a pda I’ve also had the system corrupt data files in areas of high multiple bat species feeding activity, a frustrating thing to find at the end of what you think has been a good nights survey. Having started using an EM3 this year, I’ve now gone back to connecting the Anabat to a gps only which when combined with BatNav software is a great reliable tool for simple and quick transect work.

In spite of the above drawbacks I still carry two Anabats in my survey bag because they are just so useful to have and use. The anabat is a great system for long term static surveying with low power use and low data storage requirements but with a few tweaks it could be a lot better. In an time of increased competition I’m looking forward to seeing the next iteration of this detector. If it follows the Anabat Roost Logger I’ll be more than happy

Anabat example sonogram

Anabat example sonogram

Anabat users are advised to keep an eye on Chris Corben’s site for the latest firmware and software.